Editorial: Bedford Park Locals Should Consider a No Solicitation Zone

On Oct. 1, the Country Club section of the Bronx, a middle class enclave that overlooks the Long Island Sound, will officially be considered a “non-solicitation real estate zone.” This should matter to residents living in Bedford Park. This community, just five miles west of Country Club, should add it to its arsenal of neighborhood preservation tools to help thwart the issue of over development that’s become an ongoing problem within the community. Here’s the catch: there has to be proof. The designation stops pesky realtors from pitching homeowners to sell their homes. The Country Club section evinces a suburban-like


Read More

Editorial: Good or Bad, We’ll Have Four More Years of de Blasio

Even in the face of his shady campaign finance practices, alleged pay to play scheme, propensity for exercise during work hours, and now his aggressive plan to place homeless shelters in every neighborhood, there’s a strong chance we will have four more years of Mayor Bill de Blasio after the Sept. 12 primary. This year’s race is what former politics writer and newsman Bob “Kappy” Kappstatter, now working for a Bronx elected, said to the Norwood News: “It’s an election made in heaven for the mayor.” Here’re a couple of reasons why: No recognizable challengers vying for the mayoral seat.


Read More

Editorial: Eulogy for a Public Servant

On a drizzly Monday morning, several hundred mourners gathered to pay their respects for Andrew Sandler, the former district manager for Community Board 7 who had died two days before. It was hard to peg the numbers. There were 200, perhaps close to 300 people at Sandler’s funeral, with elected officials on the city and state level personally paying their respects. The large numbers seemed to reflect the respect he carried across communities of Norwood, Bedford Park, and Riverdale. It could also be what Sandler symbolized: the unsung heroes who operate in government. Sandler was cut from that cloth, spending


Read More

Editorial: USPS and Bronx DA Need to Squash Mailbox Fishers

For the past two years, the commanding officer of the 52nd Precinct has sounded the alarm on so-called “fishing” scams where thieves feed adhesive and glue into a mailbox on the hopes of hoisting, or fishing, out mail containing money orders and checks. But the crime has not only bedeviled the precinct, but the entire Bronx. Indeed, this crime of opportunity remains even in the face of consistent arrests made on the scam. It’s also time to call out the United States Postal Service for allowing this crime to continue. The United States Postal Service, which cries over loss of


Read More

Editorial: Bring Zoning Down to the Essentials, and More Will Come

Have you ever had a conversation on what zoning is as it relates to New York City? Unless one is an urban planner, I doubt many can give a comprehensive version of the power behind zoning. In a nutshell, zoning governs how neighborhoods look across the city using a set of regulations or zoning codes that tell developers what’s allowed to be built in a neighborhood. Understanding the nitty gritty aspects of zoning poses major hurdles for anyone looking to gain control of their neighborhood’s fate, and it was pretty evident at a special Community Board 7 Land Use/Zoning and


Read More

Latest Edition of the Norwood News is Out!

Dear Fellow Readers, The eighth edition of the award-winning Norwood News is out with plenty of Bronx community news you can use. We’ve packed 16 pages full of news you can share with your family and friends, so let’s get to it. We’re keeping education on the front lines in our coverage and bring you a story out of Junior High School 80, where a three-judge panel ruled the 95-year school should receive a $3 million grant it was approved and then denied by the state. Hear why JHS 80 is in dire need of these funds, and hear from


Read More

Editorial: The Kingsbridge Ice Center, and Cuomo the Sorcerer

Could the curse of the Kingsbridge Armory be lifted? For decades, it seemed any time there’s some headway in turning it into a promising venue, a barrier gets in the way. There was the failed attempt to repurpose the enormous castle into a public school and then a mall by the Related Companies. The latest proposal that’s within reach of reality is the Kingsbridge National Ice Center (KNIC). And even then, that project has hobbled along, facing lawsuits along the way. But Governor Andrew Cuomo appears to have broken the spell. Even as the now-approved Fiscal Year 2018-19 $153 billion


Read More

Editorial: A Smarter Way to Have Your Voice Heard

Participatory Budgeting is once again under way in Councilman Andrew Cohen’s 11th Council District, which includes Norwood and Bedford Park, partially shifting a process that’s usually tasked by elected officials in a representative government and placing it into the hands of the electorate. The question posed to the public is simple: If you had $1 million to put towards physical improvements in your neighborhood, what would they be? For the past six months, a handful of residents have bounced that question around, coming up with a list of projects that can benefit their communities. During the last week of March,


Read More

Editorial: Right to Counsel Levels Playing Field

The passing of the Right to Counsel Bill, a measure that offers pro bono attorneys to residents taking their landlords to Bronx Housing Court and relieves tenants unaware of the archaic Housing Court system that is by all intents and purposes chaotic. The New York City Council debate this agreement for two years, and have finally done right by the Bronx’s working poor. For anyone who faces the task of taking their landlord to court, they would tell you it can be overwhelming, especially for those facing eviction. Usually, landlords, particularly big name ones, do not go to court. They


Read More